Norway revamps aquaculture policy

A NEW centre right government in Norway has set out its policy for the future development of the country’s aquaculture sector, which includes stepping up work on tackling sea lice.
Although there has been no election, a fresh four-way coalition has been formed after Prime Minister Erna Solberg (pictured) brought the small Christian Democrat Party into the existing three-way administration comprising the Progress, Conservative and Liberal parties.
The new government said in a statement it planned to make the industry more competitive and versatile through innovation, product development and investment in export promotion measures.
It also emphasised that the industry still had great growth potential, but it is a prerequisite that further growth is sustainable.
The statement added: ‘New technology means that in the future, the industry will be able to operate in other locations and with less risk of escapes than today. At the same time, the industry must intensify its efforts to combat disease and to reduce the risk of escapes.’
The parties agreed to a series of policies which include:
• Facilitating sustainable growth through the practice and further development of the traffic light scheme;
• Introducing future oriented regulations related to offshore aquaculture;
• Stimulating the local and regional municipalities to make facilities available to the industry through, among other things, the use of the aquaculture fund;
• Increasing investment in research, innovation and technology development;
• Using development licences to find new and better solutions for aquaculture and the seafood industry;
• Continuing a restrictive line with regard to environmental requirements for the aquaculture industry and the management of production;
• Collaborating with the industry to combat salmon lice, disease spread and escapes.
The government said it will also improve the control of waste within shipping, fisheries and fish farming, including strengthening the reception system for waste from ships in Norwegian ports.